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New Books About Women in Writing

March 27th, 2021
Categories: Kids, News, Reading Romp!
Tags: , , , ,

It’s Women’s History Month, and here at the library we have tons of books about awesome women! Here are some of our recent arrivals about women writers and journalists.

A 2021 Coretta Scott King Book Award Illustrator Honor Book

A 2021 Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor Book

A 2021 Association of Library Service to Children Notable Children’s Book

Gwendolyn Brooks, American Poet

Exquisite: The Poetry and Life of Gwendolyn Brooks (2020) by Suzanne Slade ; illustrated by Cozbi A. Cabrera

“Gwendolyn Brooks (1917–2000) is known for her poems about “real life.” She wrote about love, loneliness, family, and poverty—showing readers how just about anything could become a beautiful poem. Exquisite follows Gwendolyn from early girlhood into her adult life, showcasing her desire to write poetry from a very young age. This picture-book biography explores the intersections of race, gender, and the ubiquitous poverty of the Great Depression—all with a lyrical touch worthy of the subject. Gwendolyn Brooks was the first Black person to win the Pulitzer Prize, receiving the award for poetry in 1950. And in 1958, she was named the poet laureate of Illinois. A bold artist who from a very young age dared to dream, Brooks will inspire young readers to create poetry from their own lives.”

–Provided by the Publisher

Ethel L. Payne, American Journalist

The Power of Her Pen: The Story of Groundbreaking Journalist Ethel L. Payne (2020) by Lesa Cline-Ransome ; illustrated by John Parra

“Ethel L. Payne always had an ear for stories. Seeking truth, justice, and equality, Ethel followed stories from her school newspaper in Chicago to Japan during World War II. It even led her to the White House briefing room, where she broke barriers as one of the first black journalists. Ethel wasn’t afraid to ask the tough questions of presidents, elected officials, or any one else in charge, earning her the title “First Lady of the Black Press.” Fearless and determined, Ethel L. Payne shined a light on the darkest moments in history, and her ear for stories sought answers to the questions that mattered most in the fight for civil rights.”

–Provided by the Publisher

Zora Neale Hurston, American Author

Jump at the Sun: The True Life Tale of Unstoppable Storycatcher Zora Neale Hurston (2021) by Alicia D. Williams ; illustrated by Jacqueline Alcántara

“Zora was a girl who hankered for tales like bees for honey. Now, her mama always told her that if she wanted something, “to jump at de sun”, because even though you might not land quite that high, at least you’d get off the ground. So Zora jumped from place to place, from the porch of the general store where she listened to folktales, to Howard University, to Harlem. And everywhere she jumped, she shined sunlight on the tales most people hadn’t been bothered to listen to until Zora. The tales no one had written down until Zora. Tales on a whole culture of literature overlooked … until Zora. Until Zora jumped.”

–Provided by the Publisher

Ida B. Wells, American Journalist

Who Was Ida B. Wells? (2020) by Sarah Fabiny ; illustrated by Ted Hammond

“Born into slavery in 1862, Ida Bell Wells was freed as a result of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865. Yet she could see just how unjust the world she was living in was. This drove her to become a journalist and activist. Throughout her life, she fought against prejudice and for equality for African Americans. Ida B. Wells would go on to co-own a newspaper, write several books, help cofound the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and fight for women’s right to vote.”

–Provided by the Publisher

For more reads on awesome women, check out this recommendation post!