Today the library is open from: Closed
 

“A Killing in the Hills” Author Visit

October 23rd, 2014
Categories: Adults, News, Seniors

October 23rd, 2014

Special Book Club Alert!

The Northern Illinois Reading Council was awarded an author SKYPE visit on Monday, November 17th at 6:00 p.m. CST.  They decided to partner with us to have Julia Keller, mystery author, talk about her book, “A Killing in the Hills” and her book series.  We are preparing for her visit by reading “A Killing in the Hills”, her first book in this series.  The books are near the Book Club table next to the main adult entrance.  Check out your copy today to join us for this engaging and fun evening with warm and funny, Julia Keller.

Here are some reviews of her first novel, “A Killing in the Hills”:
“A gripping, beautifully crafted murder mystery that shows that small-town West Virginia is no longer Mayberry. Great reading.” — Scott Turow

“Julia Keller is that rare talent who combines gripping suspense, a fabulous sense of place and nuanced characters you can’t wait to come back to. A must read.” — Karin Slaughter

“A remarkably written and remarkably tense debut. I loved it.”  — Dennis Lehane

“Be careful opening this book because once you do you won’t be able to close it.”  — Tom Franklin

Keller does a superb job showing both the natural beauty of Appalachia and the hopeless anger of the people trapped there in poverty. Some characters turn out to be better than they appear, some much worse, but the ensemble cast is unforgettable. So is this novel.” — Publishers Weekly

And finally, a description of the novel:

What’s happening in Acker’s Gap, West Virginia? Three elderly men are gunned down over their coffee at a local diner, and seemingly half the town is there to witness the act. Still, it happened so fast, and no one seems to have gotten a good look at the shooter. Was it random? Was it connected to the spate of drug violence plaguing poor areas of the country just like Acker’s Gap? Or were Dean Streeter, Shorty McClurg, and Lee Rader targeted somehow? One of the witnesses to the brutal incident was Carla Elkins, teenaged daughter of Bell Elkins, the prosecuting attorney for Raythune County, West Virginia. Carla was shocked and horrified by what she saw, but after a few days, she begins to recover enough to believe that she might be uniquely placed to help her mother do her job. After all, what better way to repair their fragile, damaged relationship? But could Carla also end up doing more harm than good – in fact, putting her own life in danger? In this powerful, intricate debut from Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Julia Keller, a mother and a daughter try to do right by a town and each other before it’s too late. “Shannon McManus does a terrific job narrating Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Julia Keller’s debut novel. …McManus handles the various ages, accents, and genders with controlled enthusiasm, delivering a gripping performance of Keller’s many shocking plot twists and breathtaking descriptions of Appalachia’s beauty. First-rate listening.” – Amazon

The mission of Northern Illinois Reading Council is to provide support and professional development opportunities for reading professionals, parents, and community members in promoting lifelong literacy and learning.

We are an affiliate of Illinois Reading Council and the International Reading Association.  Our membership includes educators in DeKalb, Winnebago, Lee and Ogle Counties.

Each council in Illinois Reading Council has been awarded Illinois author skype visits for the past two years now.  Julia’s book, “A Killing in the Hills”, is one of the books on the Illinois Reads list.  Illinois Reads is a project of Illinois Reading Council which helps to sponsor and support Illinois authors.  See the “Illinois Reads” website for more information and for other authors and books for the 2014 year.  The website address is http://illinoisreads.org.

There will be refreshments served by Northern Illinois Reading Council.  This event is free and open to the public! It will be held on the third floor of the library.